? All Tech Radio Episode 355
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  • Canon shook up the camera world on Monday with its own version of a mirrorless camera featuring interchangeable lenses with the debut of the slim and versatile EOS M. Promoted as a digital video powerhouse, the new EOS is essentially a digital SLR camera shrunk into a smaller package. You may have heard of the Micro Four-Thirds cameras from the likes of Olympus and Panasonic, which are also mirrorless designs. Without the mechanical mirror system that's a feature of DSLRs, they tend to be much more compact.
  • The Amazon Kindle Fire is getting beaten badly by the new Google Nexus 7" tablet. After just a couple of weeks Google is completely out of stock. But Amazon may be the one that laughing all the way to the bank because whether they sell the Fire for a few dollars of profit, or Google sells the Nexus, Amazon is still number 1 when it comes to selling through the Amazon app on either platform.
  • The Amazon Kindle Fire is getting beaten badly by the new Google Nexus 7" tablet. After just a couple of weeks Google is completely out of stock. But Amazon may be the one that laughing all the way to the bank because whether they sell the Fire for a few dollars of profit, or Google sells the Nexus, Amazon is still number 1 when it comes to selling through the Amazon app on either platform.
  • Pwnie Express have an upcoming product called the Power Pwn that could sit unnoticed in a home or work environment and yet be spying on an entire network. It looks just like a regular power strip but it's a powerful hacking tool. The Power Pwn is described as "a fully-integrated enterprise-class penetration testing platform" that has an "ingenious form-factor" - which, I think is a euphemism for "easily hidden" - and as a "highly-integrated/modular hardware design". It costs $1300, but it could give the hacker so much more as it steals data at businesses without any knowledge.
  • Apple computer is about to give results and investors are having lowered expectations. The next iPhone isn't due until October, Asia and Europe markets don't have as much money to buy it, and in the meantime no one wants to buy the 4s because it's about to be obsolete. This is the first time in a long time people are not as excited about Apple like they used to be.
  • Again, the temptation of holding someone else's personal things seems to have been too great for one employee of Best Buy. Sophia Ellison needed her photos and contacts transferred from an old iPhone to a new one. According to WTOP radio, she hired the services of a Best Buy Geek Squad employee at Fair Oaks in Fairfax, Va. Promising to transfer her data, the employee -- called George -- allegedly offered to buy her old iPhone for $60. He also allegedly promised to wipe away all the photos and videos that were on it. And, no, she says that he didn't give her a store receipt. He took the money from his wallet. She never got the pictures but the employee got fired. Now there are racy pictures of her in the hands of the former Best Buy Employee and no one knows where they will end up. Best Buy is having financial trouble having cut the Geek Squad by a hefty percentage last month, and this won't help.
  • Nokia is considering trying something new to jumpstart its declining mobile business, according to a new report. The mobile company is currently in talks with European carriers to sign an exclusive partnership for its upcoming Windows Phone 8-based device, the Financial Times is reporting today, citing sources. The deals could see Nokia's devices offered on fewer networks, and give carriers a piece of the revenue its handsets generate. The idea, according to the Financial Times, is for carriers to receive financial incentives to actively promote Nokia products. If Nokia is indeed following such a strategy, it would mark a notable shift in the company's distribution strategy. Nokia currently attempts to bring its devices to as many carriers as possible. The idea is that the more places its devices are available, the greater the chances of registering sales. But as the company's recent performance has shown, its current strategy is in need of repair.
  • Microsoft has released pricing details for apps that can be purchased from its online Windows Store once Windows 8 goes live--and bargain hunters might be disappointed. Unlike Apple, which allows developers to charge as little as 99 cents for an app, Microsoft has set the minimum price for Windows 8 apps at $1.49. "You, as the developer, are always in control of the pricing of your app," said Arik Cohen, lead program manager for Microsoft's commerce and licensing team, in a weekend blog post. That's only partly true. Developers can choose a price tier for their app, but it's restricted to between $1.49 and $999.99. That range matches Apple's app pricing on the high end, but it's 50 cents more expensive on the low end compared to the minimum price for iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch apps
  • UCLA researchers have developed a new transparent solar cell that is an advance toward giving windows in homes and other buildings the ability to generate electricity while still allowing people to see outside. Their study appears in the journal ACS Nano. The UCLA team describes a new kind of polymer solar cell (PSC) that produces energy by absorbing mainly infrared light, not visible light, making the cells nearly 70% transparent to the human eye. They made the device from a photoactive plastic that converts infrared light into an electrical current. "These results open the potential for visibly transparent polymer solar cells as add-on components of portable electronics, smart windows and building-integrated photovoltaics and in other applications," said study leader Yang Yang, a UCLA professor of materials science and engineering, who also is director of the Nano Renewable Energy Center at California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI). Yang, who is also the holder of the Carol and Lawrence E. Tannas, Jr., Endowed Chair in Engineering, added that there has been intense world-wide interest in so-called polymer solar cells. "Our new PSCs are made from plastic-like materials and are lightweight and flexible," he said. "More importantly, they can be produced in high volume at low cost."
  • Another bit of bad news for the beleaguered EA today as the company may lose its long-held exclusive rights to its NCAA football series. This comes as part of a proposed settlement for a case dating all the way back to 2008 when a group of consumers banded together to claim that EA had created a monopoly in the industry by having the only licensed NCAA football game in town. EA has apparently now agreed to a settlement proposal that lets the current agreement expire in 2014, with no option to renew for five years after that. Additionally, consumers who have bought any EA football game in the past six years could be entitled to a payout of either $1.90 or $6.79, part of $27M in funds meant to deal with the claims.

email from listeners:

  • Karen from Miami asks "What are my backup options for my tablet and PC?"